Visionary Music Group's Logic has created a classic album with “Under Pressure,” his debut album.

Visionary Music Group’s Logic has created a classic album with “Under Pressure,” his debut album, released by Def Jam Records, which is well worth the wait.

The singles, “Buried Alive,” “Driving Ms Daisy” featuring Childish Gambino and “Alright” featuring Big Sean were released weeks before the album all of which were simply wonderful. They set an overall tone for fans and new listeners that was carried out in the entire album.

Logic begins with “Intro” a smooth interlude where he spits some real verses about thinking what it would be like when he finally made it. He says that his first week’s sales won’t define him because the only failure to him is if he has a weak verse. If listeners are looking for a weak verse from him this album is not the place to look. The intro is about Logic finally reaching his goal of putting out an album and set a beautiful tone.

Throughout the album the “Under Pressure Program” is full of information from Thalia, who gives fans facts about the album’s recording process and other facts that his fans may have not known.

Young Sinatra continues to showcase his old soul with “Soul Food.” It is yet another one of the marvels on his album production-wise. It is masterfully produced, as Logic rhymes about his childhood and addresses situations with his sister, not having his father around, his mother’s struggles and the overall struggle of being able to have a roof over his head.

Towards the middle of the song there is an epic breakdown with a beat that appeals to your soul. Logic tugs on a lot of heartstrings because his come-up is the true definition of being an underdog. He puts his heart and soul into much of his verses and though he doesn’t constantly rap about women, money and the finer things, he does manage to rap about real life struggles providing inspiration for anyone who has ever been in a struggle.

There is a lot of music on the album that caters to taking a nice ride and serves as a soundtrack for a romantic mood. “I’m Gone” is that track, and it features similar production to “Buried Alive,” with the ad-libs and sound effects that were placed perfectly providing a premium listening experience.

“Gang Related” is the fourth track on the album and plays more to the hardcore side that Logic has. He showcases his ability to embrace a whole other side from being that smooth rapper who raps about the struggle. He completely transforms and addresses situations he encountered while growing up in Gaithersburg, Maryland.

logic-master-of-his-craft-3The fifth track “Bounce” sounds like his celebration of finally making it. However, he does tell his fans that he and his crew have been at it way before the fame when it comes to partying and having a good time. It is the radio song that is strategically placed to not only show his versatility, but to give his fans a break from his deep lyrics to enjoy what he has given them so far.

“Growing Pains III” highlights yet again, the struggles that Logic went through growing up. It is the third installment in the series of songs that cater to those who are in a hard situation whether it’s growing up in a hard time, or simply going through a rough patch.

“Never Enough” a total Young Sinatra play. It is smooth and caters to the ladies, as Logic makes his announcement to all the women that he is no longer going to be messing with the basic b******. His days of settling are over, but he now has to continue his grind because what he has done so far will never be enough.

In “Metropolis” Logic plays a lyrical Superman over a jazzy beat. The song highlights his travels to far away lands and how much he prayed he would make it out of his city. Logic continues to slaughter the tracks with a non-stop flow, which at times make a listener wonder if he ever breathes when he spits his verses. There is also a little conversation towards the end of the song with a perspective Lois Lane.

“Nikki” is a smoker’s struggle with being addicted to Nicotine. Logic has been photo’d smoking cigarettes a lot in the past. At this point he has had enough and he feels more like a slave for the nicotine. He raps about all of the things that nicotine provides him and finally accepts being a slave to it in the end.

As fans may already know, Logic released a music video for the track that shares the name with the album. “Under Pressure” is a movie, a lyrical assault and a big F U to anyone who tried to get in his way. This song annihilates any notion that Logic will fall back after this album. He says his greatest fear that he is going to die alone and the diamonds in his change is his milestone.

The album version of the song separates itself from video, which showed Logic and his wrecking crew wreaking havoc on thugs and police. There are multiple breakdowns where he recalls phone calls with his little sister, his father and other family members. He also apologizes at the end for being distant from those who tried to reach him in a touching end to what began as a verbal assault on haters.

The final tracks to address, “Now” and “Till the End” feature a compilation of subject matters from the rest featured on the album. “Till the End” hones in on the smooth side of Logic while “Now” embraces his hardcore nature.

The album featured production from, No I.D. who was also the executive producer for the album, along with 6ix, DJ Dahi, S-1, M-Phazes, DJ Khalil, Dun Deal, Rob Knox, S1, Tae Beast and Logic himself contributes to the masterful production.

Logic has cultivated all of his talents and after years of giving away free music to fans he is finally able to produce a full-length album of his own. He has come a very long way and anyone who listens to the music will understand that. Fans will love it and new listeners will be impressed with what Logic has displayed on “Under Pressure.”